Congratulations to Andrew Poppe for winning the AGU Planetary Sciences Section Outstanding Student Paper Award for his paper entitled “Non-monotonic potentials above the lunar surface: implications for electron reflectivity measurements.” As an integrated part of two NLSI teams, we are proud of his accomplishments and the fine work he has done as part of Mihaly Horanyi’s group at the University of Colorado. Congratulations on completing the PhD program and best wishes for a wonderful post-doc at UC Berkeley as part of the DREAM team.

Dr. Andrew Poppe studied physics at the University of Colorado. His research included simulation of the lunar photoelectron sheath with particle-in-cell code in order to understand observed lunar dusty plasma phenomena. In addition to his lunar simulations, he also worked on the Student Dust Counter on the New Horizons mission, NASA’s first satellite to the Pluto-Charon system. Outside of grad school, he enjoys road cycling, hiking and lots of reading.

Posted: Jul 11, 11:59 am

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SSERVI Science Teams

  • Observations of the lunar impact plume from the LCROSS event

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    McMath‐Pierce telescope observed sodium (Na) emission from LCROSS impact on October 9, 2009.When the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) impacted Cabeus crater on October 9th, it pitched up frozen water along with some sodium, astronomers reported today.

    According to the LCROSS team, the impact event pitched up about 660 pounds of water frozen on the bottom of the crater. NLSI researcher R. M. Killen at NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center reported that the plume also contained about 3.3 pounds of sodium chloride.

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Did you know?

The moon is actually moving away from earth at a rate of 1.5 inches per year.

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