Image of Kaguya impact on the Moon at approximately 18:25 Universal time from the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Image credit: Bernard Foing of the European Space Agency.

The Japanese Kaguya probe ended its Moon mission on June 10th with an impact on the lunar surface. Observers were able to spot a bright flash from the crash (above), and researchers will study its impact site to watch how radiation and micrometeoroids weather the newly exposed lunar soil over time.

The event was captured in HD video via onboard instruments. During its mission the probe made the world’s first HD video of the lunar surface. This amazing video is so clear it was easily mistaken for a computer simulation.

Launched in September 2007, the primary task of Kaguya was to further our scientific knowledge of the Moon’s origin and evolution by studying its composition, gravitational field and surface characteristics.

Kaguya deployed two smaller satellites after reaching lunar orbit that allowed it to relay data to Earth while it was on the moon’s far side and to better measure anomalies in the moon’s gravitational field.

Read more about this historic event in the news: Japanese Lunar Orbiter
Impacts Moon

Posted by: Soderman/NLSI Staff
Source: JAXA/ESA

Share →

SSERVI Science Teams

  • NLSI’s LUNAR team tests Kapton film for radio telescopes

    525

    The Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI) with polyimide foil and embedded low frequency dipoles will study the early Universe.NLSI’s LUNAR team is testing of a piece of Kapton film at the University of Colorado at Boulder under a vacuum of about 10^-7 torr. The objective of this month long test is to simulate the lunar conditions that the Kapton film will experience during a year on the moon. The vacuum chamber will be cycled between -150 and 100 degrees Celscius with each hot or cold cycle lasting 24 hours.

Inspiration Room

NLSI Inspiration Room

Did you know?

The distance to the Moon is measured to a precision of a few centimeters by bouncing laser beams off reflectors placed there by the Apollo astronauts.

Read More



Upcoming Events